Month: February 2012

It is starting to look more like a dress now. I put gathered 1 inch lace edging along the 2 seam lines, but I am not sure about that, it may be too much, but I’ll have to wait until I get more completed to see if it overshadows the embroidery or if it looks out of place.

 

I decided to make the remainder of the skirt bottom out of panels divided by lace, each panel will have embroidery like the front but gradually tapering down to only embroidery at the bottom. This is one of the panels that will be attached directly behind the front panel.

A little hint. If you have to stop an embroidery design in the middle of the project, there are some important steps you should take, in order to be able to finish correctly. (Ask me how I know… lol)

On my embroidery machine, and I assume on probably all embroidery machines, there is a stitch counter that displays the stitch count where you are currently in the design.

In this photo you can see the stitch count is at #11885. If I needed to stop at this point, for whatever reason, say reloading the bobbin, or to go do something else, etc., I keep a notepad and pen by my machine and I jot down that stitch count number.

Then, if while you were away, the machine gets turned off, for whatever reason, maybe the electricity blinks, somebody accidentally hits the switch or the cord, etc., then you can return to the exact spot to finish. If you fail to do this, and the machine gets turned off, the pattern will be reset to the beginning and it will be virtually impossible to find the same spot to finish that pattern. I learned this the hard way!

Ever try to embroider on really thin fabric like Organdy? I was attempting to machine embroider on Organdy for a new Christening Gown I have designed, but was having difficulty keeping it taut in the hoop. After quite a few trials and errors, and searching for info on the internet, I found a new technique. Organdy is fairly stiff fabric but very, very sheer and thin, so it slips easily in the hoop. I solved this problem by using a thin layer of rubber drawer liner cut out like a frame to go between the organdy and the top hoop. This holds the organdy very nicely.

Embroidering Organdy
Embroidering Organdy

This photo shows one on the right that was done without the rubber sheet, one on the left with the sheet, much neater.

Embroidering on Organdy
Embroidering on Organdy

In this photo you can see how the frame of rubber fits into the hoop.

I learn something new about sewing every day.

I fell in love with this Alice Dress Pattern from Wendy Schoen/Petite Poche, the first time I saw it and decided I wanted to make it for my granddaughter, Hope. I could vision the embroidery in reds and greens for christmas. I used genuine Irish Handkerchief Linen for the dress in white. Embroidery was worked by hand in red and green.

 

I think it came out beautiful

 

My oldest son had a suit when he was a newborn that was microcheck red gingham with a white bodice, footed pants to match, shirt buttoned up the back. I loved that little suit for him and wanted to make one just like it for Teddy.

It is difficult to find cute patterns for baby boys but I ran across this pattern a while back and bookmarked it because it had footed pants. I adapted the shirt part to button down the back, and made the top half of the shirt in white with redwork embroidery in a design suitable for christmas.

Detail of Top
Detail of Top
Completed Suit
Completed Suit

It isn’t the exact same suit as the one I had for Michael, but it is pretty darn close.

I was lucky enough to find a photo of Michael in his suit.

Michael in his suit in 1980
Michael in his suit in 1980
Teddy in his suit in 2011
Teddy in his suit in 2011

I had seen this beautiful dress on the cover of Sew Beautiful magazine and wanted to make it for a while.

Beautiful blue dress on the cover of Sew Beautiful Magazine.
Beautiful blue dress on the cover of Sew Beautiful Magazine.

I decided to make it for my oldest grandchild, Hope, knowing that she was getting too old for frilly dresses, she wants to look like a teenager, not a little girl. The photo above is a close up detail of the lace fancy band on the bottom of the dress.

Overall Dress
Overall Dress
Detail of Sleeve
Detail of Sleeve
Wide Lace Collar
Wide Lace Collar

 

While doing research for christening gowns, I ran across some photos of an antique Ayrshire christening gown. I fell in love with this beauty and have decided to try and reproduce an Ayrshire gown. Ayrshire Embroidery is hard to find, I could not find a source for any Ayrshire linens to use for the dress, so I will have to embroider my own by machine. I searched for “whitework” patterns in order to find something similar to Ayrshire.

Ayrshire embroidery, also known as sewed muslin, was worked in white cotton thread on white cotton muslin, usually in floral designs with trailing foliage, occasionally incorporating peacocks or other birds. It is characterised by cut-out spaces filled with needlepoint lace stitches, often in circular wheel patterns, surrounded by satin stitch with stem, beading and other stitches. It is most often found on baby robes, caps and bibs, women’s collars, cuffs and caps.

Close up detail of embroidery